II (2) (B). Other Drug Policy (Prohibited Substances)

MIT prohibits the use, sale, manufacturing, distribution, possession, or facilitation of the use of illegal drugs and other illegal substances, as well as substances that are generally recognized as dangerous and detrimental to the individual and community, even though they may not be illegal (including, but not limited to, whippits, 2-C’s, NBOME, research drugs, Spice, K-2, non-prescribed performance enhancing drugs) (referred to in this policy as “prohibited substances”).

Additionally, MIT prohibits persons from permitting the use of prohibited substances, as defined in this policy, in one’s campus residence, including in Fraternities, Sororities, and Independent Living Groups (FSILGs). MIT also prohibits the unlawful distribution, possession, social sharing, non-prescribed use, or abuse of prescription drugs. Altering, tampering, or forging a prescription is also prohibited.

Recreational Marijuana

Although the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has approved legislation to legalize recreational use of marijuana by people at or over the age of 21, MIT must abide by federal law, including the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, in order to remain eligible for federal funding to the Institute, including student financial aid. Therefore, MIT must continue to maintain and enforce its prohibition on the use of marijuana. This means that for all students, regardless of age, MIT prohibits the use, sale, manufacturing, distribution, possession, or facilitation of the use of marijuana on campus, including in all FSILGs, or as part of any MIT-sponsored activities.

This policy does not restrict lawful possession and use of marijuana while off-campus by members of the MIT community age 21 or older, unless it takes place in a MIT approved living group or as part of any MIT-sponsored activities. MIT prohibits the unlawful manufacturing, selling, and distribution of marijuana regardless of location or age.

Medicinal Marijuana

Because the federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act applies to the use of medical marijuana, MIT policy includes the prohibition of marijuana for medicinal purposes on campus, including in all FSILGs, or as part of any MIT-sponsored activities. This prohibition applies even if the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) has issued a Medical Marijuana Registry identification card to an individual, authorizing that individual to possess and use marijuana for medicinal purposes. Thus, despite whatever state law may permit, MIT policy strictly prohibits any person with a medical marijuana card from possessing, using, distributing, selling, manufacturing, or facilitating the use of medical marijuana on campus, including in all FSILGs, or as part of any MIT-sponsored activities. For those students who have a medical condition that may qualify as a disability, please contact the Student Disabilities Office to discuss alternative accommodations and support that may be available to address disability-related needs.