II (17). Intimate Partner Violence

MIT prohibits intimate partner violence. Intimate Partner Violence is defined as actual or threatened physical violence, intimidation, or other forms of physical or sexual abuse that would cause a reasonable person to fear harm to self or others. For this policy, “intimate relationship” means marriage, domestic partnership, engagement, casual or serious romantic involvement, and dating, whether in a current or former relationship. Intimate Partner Violence can occur between persons of any gender identity, any sexual orientation, and it can occur in any type of intimate relationship including monogamous, non-committed, and relationships involving more than two partners. Intimate Partner Violence can be a single act or a pattern of behavior. Intimate Partner Violence is sometimes referred to as, and includes behaviors that would be considered, dating violence, domestic violence, or relationship abuse.

Intimate Partner Violence can take many forms. Examples include, but are not limited to, situations in which the following behaviors are directed toward a partner in a current or former intimate relationship: hitting, kicking, punching, strangling, or other violence; property damage; and threat of violence to one’s self, one’s partner, or the family members, friends, pets, or personal property of the partner.